License Plate Translation

My dad used to remind me the limit part of speed limit was the most important.

California tags suggest you drive at 100 MPH and weave in and out of traffic.

He reminded me not to expect any grace if I happened to be driving 57 in a 55 mile per hour zone.  I’m reminded in Idaho we’re told you won’t get any break for exceeding the limit.  It should remind us exactly what a sign posted means for drivers, however.

On the Interstate it appears to translate several different ways.

  1. Idaho plates on a car or truck requires you to drive 7 to 15 miles below the posted limit.
  2. Utah plates suggest you drive everywhere in Idaho 15 miles per hour above the limit.
  3. California tags suggest you drive at 100 MPH and weave in and out of traffic.
  4. Plates from Alberta and BC translate as, “What limit?”
  5. Texas tags simply tell us, “We don’t need no stinking limit!”
  6. Washington drivers speed but brake at every exit for a latte.
  7. Wyoming plates.  Seriously, horses don't have license plates!
  8. Montana.  From my experience I've never actually seen them drive.  For crying out loud, when you go there you drive for hours and never see another car.
  9. Nevada tags scream, "Gangway!"
  10. Arizona.  These plates explain the driver is retired, 85-years-old and never drives anywhere above 25 MPH.