First, it’s often fun to read.  The raves are also a good place to look when I’m looking for a place to eat.  The praise heaped on good wait staff is pleasant to see.  My mom waited tables for many years.  She worked days on an assembly line and then nights and weekends in a diner.  It wasn’t easy.  While I realize a server may sometimes have a bad day, I always want to cut them some slack.

The other category of rant would be what a friend calls “first world problems”.  Maybe driving fits in both categories.

When it comes to the rants, there are two categories.  “I know how that feels,” is the first.  You’ll see the rant and it has a familiar ring.  Been there, done that.  The only one I haven’t seen much (maybe I should post) deals with local drivers.  More specifically the guy in front of me on Eastland Drive yesterday.  The fellow driving 8 to 10 miles below the speed limit.  Then I discovered his twin on Fillmore Street driving 15 miles under the limit.  They were both oblivious to the man who just wanted to get home!

Maybe as I grow older I simply pay more attention to other drivers.  I suppose people aren’t any better or worse than 40-years-ago.  And I never had to experience Utah drivers on a large scale until a few years back.

The other category of rant would be what a friend calls “first world problems”.  Maybe driving fits in both categories.

He has since moved to Oklahoma after having lived most of his life in Idaho.  He once served as police chief in Stanley, later as a firefighter and then rescued people from canyons and other death defying stunts.  It changed him.  He appreciates every day, no matter the inconveniences!

On the other hand, if patience is a virtue, then I’m going to hell.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.