Idahoans are no strangers to scams. We've all gotten calls from "IRS agents" demanding money, or emails promising a free vacation if we just click on the link. Make sure you're aware of these scams that are targeting Idahoan's hard-earned paychecks. Here are five of the most common scams in Idaho, and how you can avoid them.

1. The "Free Vacation" Scam

You get an email promising a free vacation if you just click on the link and enter your personal information. This is a classic phishing scam designed to steal your identity and your hard-earned money. Be very careful about any emails promising free vacations or other prizes, and never click on any links or enter your personal information unless you are absolutely sure it is a legitimate website.

2. The "Charity" Scam

With Idaho being such a giving state, it's no surprise that scammers have started targeting Idahoans with fake charities. You might get an email or even a call from someone claiming to be from a legitimate charity, but they are actually just trying to steal your money. Be sure to research any charity before you give them any money, and never give out your personal information or credit card number to anyone you don't know.

3. The "Payday Loan" Scam

This is a particularly insidious scam that targets people who are in a financial bind. You might get an email or a call from someone offering you a "guaranteed" payday loan, but in reality, they are just trying to steal your money. Be very careful about any offers for payday loans, and never give out your personal information or credit card number to anyone you don't know.

4. The "Tech Support" Scam

This is a scam that targets people who are not very tech-savvy. You might get a pop-up on your computer screen that looks like it's from Microsoft or Apple, telling you that there is a problem with your computer and you need to call a certain number for tech support. But this is just a scam to get your credit card number so they can charge you for bogus services. If you see a pop-up like this, don't click on any links. Turn off your computer and take it to Geek Squad at Best Buy or a local computer repair shop for a thorough virus scan.

5. The "Phishing" Scam

This is a scam where someone tries to get your personal information by pretending to be from a legitimate company. They might send you an email that looks like it's from your bank, or they might set up a fake website that looks like a legitimate website. They are just trying to steal your password or your credit card number, so be very careful about any emails or websites that ask for your personal information. If you're not sure if something is legitimate, always contact the company directly to verify before you enter any information.

Make sure your parents and grandparents know about scams

It goes without saying that older people are more likely to fall for scams than younger generations. They're not stupid, they just come from a time when handshake deals were common and you could take what a person said at face value. You can do your part in preventing scams by making sure the elders in your family are well educated about scams and how to avoid them.

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