The inflation rate for Idaho and flyover country is far worse than the national average.  Idaho is one of many states in the Intermountain West and the central United States that experienced an inflation rate of nearly 7.5 percent in October.  The national average clocked in at a staggering 6.2 percent.  You may have already noticed times are bad.  Restaurant prices climbed by more than 5 percent in October and some staples of the diet have seen rapid spikes. 

It’s called stopping the printing press.  An end to fiat currency will slow down the rate of inflation.

Many in the establishment news media claim there’s little the government can currently do to stop runaway price increases.  Though many economists argue the cause is simple.  The value of your dollars has been shrinking with every additional trillion dollars the government prints and calls “relief”.  Is the extra money really necessary when the national jobless rate is below 5 percent?

The cost for food basics like large eggs is up 40 cents a dozen from last year.  A survey released this week suggests your Thanksgiving turkey could cost double what you paid in 2019.

The number of shoppers flocking to discount groceries rose by 62 percent last week!  It reflects a desire among Americans to squeeze everything they can from their wallets and purses.  CNN reports that even cold cuts will skyrocket in price.

One newspaper columnist believes President Biden should drain the nation’s oil reserves.  This would offer temporary respite at the pumps, but closing pipelines doesn’t help in the long run.  If we get into a shooting war in the Pacific, you’ll get up the next morning and possibly find there’s no gas available.

There’s a solution the political left doesn’t like.  It’s called stopping the printing press.  An end to fiat currency will slow down the rate of inflation.  You can get back to an old solution when it comes to managing your money.  You can earn it!

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See How School Cafeteria Meals Have Changed Over the Past 100 Years

Using government and news reports, Stacker has traced the history of cafeteria meals from their inception to the present day, with data from news and government reports. Read on to see how various legal acts, food trends, and budget cuts have changed what kids are getting on their trays.