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Now, why didn’t I think of that?  CNET has a story about scientists who claim we’ll someday eat recycled wind turbine blades.  The same blades that slice through birds, get covered in bird poop, oil, dust, and a thick coating of grime.  Yum!

The writer explains that one byproduct could be gummy bears.  This is really what you want to feed your kids.  The scientists do say we’ll need to boil down the constituent parts in order to separate the ground glass from the gummies.  Otherwise, your children will be eviscerated from the inside out.

I’m reminded of the limousine liberals who suggest we can save the planet by eating insects.    Though, I would imagine the communist party elite have better choices.  In Japan, scientists are cleaning up poop and claim some remnants can be eaten.  Soylent Green is people!

I think the story about the recycled gummy bears is just a smokescreen.  The wind industry isn’t making many friends, and it needs to come up with something to excuse a big problem.  Candy is a stretch, that’s how serious a challenge the industry has.

Meanwhile, billionaire Bill Gates is buying up farmland with the goal of cutting off your taste for beef and dairy.  He recommends fungus as an alternative.  Check out the video below.  At about 6 and half minutes in, he finds a willing media dupe to help spread the message.  Watch Anderson Cooper struggle to avoid gagging on-air.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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