Blame it on a shortage of concrete!  Twin Falls City Councilwoman Ruth Pierce tells me it will set back completion of the project, although.  It’s going to get done.  The concrete shortage shouldn’t be a surprise.  Unlike the shortages we’ve seen with many other goods the last 15 months, this one wasn’t entirely caused by recent events.You can also look around Idaho and realize the demand is intense from Twin Falls all the way to Payette.

During a period between 2005 and 2012, China poured more concrete than all combined previous pours in human history.  Concrete production is a very intensive process.  The environmentalists also say it’s bad for the planet.

Concrete shipments from around the world were slowed by the arrival of COVID-19.  Many coastal ports are also in need of modernization.  It would allow some additional space for unloading ships.

You can also look around Idaho and realize the demand is intense from Twin Falls all the way to Payette.  The building boom shows no signs of slowing.

The project at Madrona Street and Falls Avenue is an expensive one.  It’s being financed by impact fees on new construction and not by your tax dollars.  It’s one of several intersections in the city where you could make an argument a light is needed.

There are some places where I try and make a left turn and find myself spending a lot of time waiting for heavy traffic to pass.  One place I would make an argument for a light is South Blue Lakes and Park Avenue.  The traffic coming from the south on Blue Lakes is growing.  It’s anecdotal but I’ve been encountering the left turn off Park Avenue for six and a half years.  Trust me, there’s a lot more traffic coming into the city!

LOOK: Route 66’s quirkiest and most wonderful attractions state by state

Stacker compiled a list of 50 attractions--state by state--to see along the drive, drawing on information from historic sites, news stories, Roadside America, and the National Park Service. Keep reading to discover where travelers can get their kicks on Route 66.