About twice a year I get an email from Ancestry.com and an update on my genetic soup.  I took the test during the summer of 2017.  Within a few weeks I had results and believed them final.  Then other family members did the same and as more spit into the tube, the mosaic began to change.  Even relatives get differing results because they received different packages of DNA.  Ancestry then tries to come up with some answers about origins.

My last name is a somewhat anglicized version of “Kilcooley” or perhaps “Gilcooley”.  The first syllable was dropped long ago.  It’s Irish.  I’ve met other people with the same last name across North America.  Some have Welsh, English or Scottish ancestry.  They’re not relatives.  We simply ended up with the same current spelling.

I’m not surprised.  My mother’s maiden name was Gordon.

My original template showed a large plurality of Irish ancestry, followed by German and Scottish.  An update arrived a few weeks ago and my Scots DNA has now pushed aside the German.  The latter is now greatly reduced.  I’m not surprised.  My mother’s maiden name was Gordon.

By the way, the people are called Scots.  Scotch is a drink.  If you’re family has been in North America for more than 3 generations, you likely have Scottish ancestry.

I took the picture of the vapor trails a few days ago.  The trails form the St. Andrew’s Cross.  The flag of Scotland.  It was later incorporated into the current British Flag and then there were additional alterations made to add some Irish elements after the Act of Union, which remains a controversial subject in Ireland and Scotland.

A friend lives in a state where his truck needs only a rear license plate.  On the front of the truck is the Scottish flag.  Periodically, someone comes along and demands to know why he has a Confederate flag on his bumper.

There are two possible responses.  You can use it as an educational moment.  Or you can ask them why they decided to vote for Hillary in 2016.  Because, clearly these are very confused people.