Nationwide data on cell phone usage while driving among U.S. teenagers continues to show that distracted driving is a major cause of annual traffic fatalities, now becoming worse than driving intoxicated in some states.

Teen driving in this country has become a major concern. Transportation departments across the United States are releasing some very troubling statistics. According to recent data shared publicly, one in three females admit to regularly taking pictures behind the wheel, while 10% of iPhone users admit to watching videos on sites such as YouTube while operating their vehicles.

Almost one third of the traffic deaths that happened on Idaho roadways during this year's "100 Deadliest Days," which is the nickname for the time period between Memorial Day and Labor Day, were due to distracted driving. A large number of these deaths occurred on rural roadways, according to a September 2019 report by ktvb.com.

Idaho was listed in the top 10 U.S. states in 2017 for traffic fatalities linked to texting and driving, with 47% of licensed motorists admitting to doing it. Current numbers lead one to believe the Gem State is still among national leaders in this category.

That same 2017 report revealed that 6% of teen drivers admitted to drinking and driving, and 7.3% said they routinely do not wear seat belts. The national leader for admitted teen texting and driving was the state of Iowa, with 55% of teens saying they do it regularly.