As a parent with a kindergartener currently enrolled in the Twin Falls School District, we had to make the decision a few weeks ago on whether or not to home school, or put our child in a classroom while Covid-19 cases were again spiking.

Just prior to the start of the 2021-2022 school year back in mid-August, we attended the open house for our son at a local elementary school. We fully intended on having him in the classroom, and interacting with his fellow peers. That option changed when we were informed the school was making masks optional, so we decided to home school.

Covid-19 hospitalizations among younger children is on the rise in the United States. Between August 5 and September 2, more than 750,000 new Covid-19 were reported across the country, according to a state report. More than 5 million children have tested positive for the virus since the pandemic began in 2020.

The Twin Falls School District just released a report that shows 308 total cases have been verified since tracking began August 16, 2021. This breaks down to 268 students, and 41 faculty members. The largest spike of cases hit the week of August 28, with 106 student cases reported.

School officials informed my wife and I at the start of the academic year that cases would be closely monitored, and safety protocols could be put into effect if student cases increase. Many schools across the country have been heavily impacted by new Covid-19 cases, and are beginning to implement changes for the safety of students and faculty.

READ MORE: 50 resources to help you educate your kids at home

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

KEEP READING: See states hit hardest by COVID-19’s impact on tourism

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