Some of our country's oldest and tallest trees are in danger from human beings. In an effort to prevent the destruction of land surrounding these marvelous, branched time capsules, laws could soon forbid us from getting too close to these giants.

It's been a few years since I visited Redwood National Park in California. The draw for many to this location is the fact that some of the planet's oldest and tallest trees reside there. If you've never explored the park, I implore all Idahoans to try to pass through the entrance at least once.

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Hyperion is a tree that stands nearly 400 feet tall in a section of the park, that despite being closed off to tourists is still sustaining irreversible damage from those who don't follow rules. It's reached the point where people who trample the forest floor or leave garbage surrounding the awe-inspiring tree could face fines of up to $5,000, according to npr.org.

Think of a world where children can only view our planet's most incredible living trees from several hundred feet away, instead of getting to stand under and place a hand on them as we can do now. Idaho also has trees that are comparable to the ones out west.

Near the Elk River in the panhandle of Idaho are Red Cedar trees that are said to be as old as 3,000 years, and stand nearly 200 feet tall. They are referred to by some as the "Champion Trees of Idaho."

If you ever get the opportunity to stop by and view them, do so respectfully.

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